Tag: Auto Repair Conway AR

Road Trip! Check off these important points before setting out

News

If vacation-time means a road trip, a few simple preparations can keep you safe and out of trouble.

Under the hood:

Check all fluids, including oil, coolant, brake fluid and windshield washer fluid. Check the air filter. Check the battery.

The tires and the spare:

The owner’s manual, or your online car health guide, will tell you what the tire pressure should be. Make sure tires are properly inflated. That goes for the spare, too. Imagine the trouble this could save.

Inspect the tires to make sure there is enough tread. The old penny in the tread trick should work: Hold the penny so that Lincoln’s head is upside down and facing you. If you can see his whole head, it’s time to replace the tire.

Lights and signals:

Besides the obvious safety issues, proper lights and signals are just one more reason why you won’t get a ticket — or a nasty look from other drivers.

Safety gear:

At an absolute minimum, make sure you have the tools to change a tire.

But also consider carrying a spare, fully charged cell phone and battery-powered phone charger, drinking water, a gas can, and a flashlight. It is not a bad idea to carry an emergency reflective triangle and a flare; especially useful if you will be going into back country.

Just in case:

Do you have a spare key accessible from outside the car? What about jumper cables? A bowl so that Fido can have a drink?  How about a rain poncho?

Basics:

Take your license, proof of insurance and registration.

 

Customer Service Representative

1215 Thomas G. Wilson Drive

Conway, AR 72032

(501)327-1882

They save lives, but . . .Know what happens when an airbag deploys!

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In 1969, the new trend in driving safety was air pillows. Those pillows stayed around but their name changed, and no wonder.

An airbag is no pillow, but while a deployed airbag is not a comfy experience, it remains a landmark of safety.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that airbags have saved 44,869 lives from 1987 to 2015.

According to Popular Science, in a head-on collision, a car stops fast, but the bodies inside the car don’t.  The momentum of the bodies inside continues until the windshield, dashboard or steering wheel brings them to a stop — usually with dire consequences.

The idea of an airbag is not just to pillow the blow, but to lower the impact by spreading it over a larger area of the body.  No single area of the body bears the brunt of deceleration, according to Popular Science.

To accomplish this, airbags deploy within 1/25th of a second of impact, filling the nylon airbag with nitrogen and instantly deflating. Tiny holes in the bag begin releasing gas the moment a driver’s head hits the bag, absorbing the impact. This is why the driver’s head doesn’t hit the bag and then whip backward.

A white puff of cornstarch might also come out of the bag. The cornstarch keeps the bag supple while it is in storage. Newer cars have airbags with silicone coatings that make the cornstarch unnecessary.

Because airbags stop the body, they prevent deadly head injuries and whiplash.  But they do sometimes cause red impact burns on the body and break eyeglasses.

Customer Service Representative

1215 Thomas G. Wilson Drive

Conway, AR 72032

(501)327-1882

How to drive in hail

News

Hail storms are extremely dangerous to drive in. Not only can they cause extensive damage to your car but can also be harmful to anyone who decides to venture out of their vehicle.

Hail can also impair visibility and even break your car’s windows in extreme conditions. If hail is severe, stop driving and pull over to a safe – preferably sheltered – place.

If you have to travel, plan your route to avoid known affected areas.

We also recommend informing relatives and friends of your intended route in case of an emergency.

The following tips should always be followed when driving in hail storms:

  • Stay inside the vehicle. Hail falls at fast speeds, and can cause injury
  • If hail is severe, stop driving and pull over to a safe place so the hail doesn’t break the windshield or any windows. Stop under an overpass if you can, or pull out of traffic lanes and on to a hardshoulder
  • Keep your car angled so that the hail is hitting the front of your car. Windshields are reinforced to withstand forward driving and pelting objects. Side windows and backglass are not and are much more susceptible to breakage
  • Avoid ditches due to possible high-rising water

Customer Service Representative

1215 Thomas G. Wilson Drive

Conway, AR 72032

(501)327-1882

Many dangers of a highway work zone

News

Highway work zones are annoying, but motorists should never leave the traffic lane to avoid delays.

Even if the way appears clear, driving into a work zone is incredibly dangerous for workers.

A highway work zone or any work zone in a public area has a number of associated risks, according to The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).  Injuries and fatalities result from three causes:

1 Passing traffic.

2 Construction vehicles working inside the work zone.

3 Construction vehicles entering and leaving the work zone.

Construction laborers on foot are most at risk from all three causes.

In the period between 1992 and 1998, construction laborers represented the highest percentage of fatalities at 42 percent. They were equally as likely to be struck by a passing car as they were to be struck by a construction vehicle, according to NIOSH.

 

Customer Service Representative

1215 Thomas G. Wilson Drive

Conway, AR 72032

(501)327-1882

Cellphone usage while walking or driving is BAD….

News

Pedestrians are dying at levels that haven’t been seen in 25 years, according to a new Governor’s Highway Safety Association report.

The reason appears to be that people are ignoring some of the first lessons they learned as children: Watch where you are walking and look both ways.

The reason for that?

Walkers using cellphones, for one thing. More specifically texting while walking. Combine that with drivers using cellphones and the death toll is mounting.

Nearly 6,000 pedestrian fatalities occurred in 2017, a jarring statistic. In fact, the spike in pedestrian deaths began in 2015 with a 9.5 percent increase over the previous year. In 2016, there was another 9 percent increase.

Improvements in vehicle safety such as automatic emergency braking, rearview cameras and collision alert technology have not been able to change the pedestrian death trend, according to the National Highway Traffic Administration.

About 75 percent of pedestrian deaths happen at night. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, dim headlights might bear some responsibility. Every year, about 2,500 pedestrians are killed at night while crossing a road. In many cases, drivers can’t see them because their headlights are not bright enough.

Customer Service Representative

1215 Thomas G. Wilson Drive

Conway, AR 72032

(501)327-1882

Car Seat Replacement After Accident

News

 

If you have been involved in a car crash and had a child restrained in a child car seat, the seat may need to be replaced.  In April 2004, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) announced changes to the agency’s recommendations about replacing child safety seats following a crash. NHTSA explains:

“The change was made to ensure parents or caregivers continue to correctly restrain their children following a minor crash and to reduce the burden of unnecessary child safety seat replacement.”

NHTSA continues to advise parents and caregivers that child safety seats should be replaced if they have been involved in a moderate or severe crash.

A crash is minor — and the seat involved in it is safe for reuse — if it meets all of the following criteria:

1) A visual inspection of the child safety seat, including inspection under any easily movable seat padding, does not reveal any cracks or deformation that might have been caused by the crash.

2) The vehicle in which the child safety seat was installed was capable of being driven from the crash scene.

3) The vehicle door nearest the child safety seat was undamaged.

4) There were no injuries to any of the vehicle occupants.

5) The air bags (if any) did not deploy.

Crashes that meet all of these criteria are much less severe than the dynamic test used in compliance tests of FMVSS 213 “Child Restraint Systems” and are highly unlikely to affect future child safety seat performance. Therefore, parents and caregivers can be confident that child restraints involved in these minor crashes will continue to provide a high level of protection.

NHTSA recommend parents and caregivers check with their child seat manufacturer with regard to performance, operation, and installation of their child restraint.

Most car seat instruction booklets continue to recommend child safety seats be replaced if they have been involved in a car crash, regardless if they are in the seat or not.  Look in the car seat owner’s manual for your manufacturer’s statement of their policy.

Most insurance carriers will reimburse you for the replacement of a new car seat if it was in a crash.  Check with the insurance carrier handling the accident for more details as all policies are different.

 

***If you have any questions don’t hesitate to call Jody or Rachel our certified passenger safety techs, or email any questions to rachel.sharping@ajcollisionrepair.com***

Customer Service Representative

1215 Thomas G. Wilson Drive

Conway, AR 72032

(501)327-1882

Robotic vests gain acceptance in industry…

News

A vest that acts as an external skeleton might be one answer to reducing occupational health injuries.

The vest, developed by Ekso Biotics, is currently being used by the Ford Motor Company and has been widely tested since 2010.

Workers in industry and construction frequently have jobs that require them to keep their arms raised and outstretched for hours, often using tools while they are doing so. At Ford, according to Ekso, workers in repetitive overhead tasks raise their arms an average of 4,600 times per day or a million times a year.

The wear-and-tear on shoulders is dramatic.  Workers in repetitive lifting jobs frequently have shoulder injury and chronic pain. About 13.6 percent of all workplace injuries are shoulder injuries, according to a study by the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI). Shoulder injuries cause a median number of 24 days off work, the greatest number for any body part. Along with this, the incidence of chronic pain is 41 percent, commonly in the 45- to 64-year-old age group. Construction and manufacturing workers often are forced to end their careers early because of pain and injury.

For employers, these statistics are daunting. A NCCI study that looked at 4.2 million workman’s compensation claims from 1996 to 2000, showed that shoulder injuries were the most costly.

Enter the EksoVest. The 9.5 pound vest can be strapped on in seconds like a jacket. It is a wearable robot, that works to support the weight of the worker’s arms, putting less strain on their shoulders. The vest provides 5 to 15 pounds of lift assistance per arm, noticeably supporting overhead tasks.

According to Ekso, “By reducing the strain on a workers body, he/she not only feels better at the end of every day, it also reduces the likelihood that the worker will sustain injury. Jobs get completed to a higher level of quality, in a shorter amount of time, increasing both productivity and morale.”

Customer Service Representative

1215 Thomas G. Wilson Drive

Conway, AR 72032

Facts to teach your new teen driver

News

Teen drivers are inexperienced, usually distracted, and impulsive, statistics show.

That’s every single teenager, from the A student to the wild child.

That won’t come as news to the insurance industry, which charges high rates for teen  drivers. But, teens might not know the dangers of their own inexperience. Parents who are teaching their kids to drive might point out some sad truths.

First, teens have a lot of car accidents and car accidents kill.

Of all age groups, 16-year-olds have the highest crash rates, and a full third of all deaths among 13- to 19-year-olds are likely to occur in a car crash. In fact, more than 3,000 people die in car accidents every single day.

Second, teens are unusually distracted behind the wheel.

According to dosomething.org, more than half of teen drivers admit they use a phone while driving.

More worrisome is that texting can take eyes off the road for almost five seconds — a lot of time for something to go wrong. Car and Driver Magazine did a study on this and found texting while driving had the same effect as driving drunk.

Teens must learn to leave their phones unanswered while driving. That’s a lesson adults can learn too since 27 percent of adults have read or sent a text message while driving.

Third, driving around teen friends can be deadly. Fatality rates increase with each extra passengers in the car. It’s dangerous for the driver and for the teen rider. Fewer than half of teens say they would speak up if the driver was scaring them.

Teens must also recognize that their inexperience can get them into trouble. Driving in poor conditions such as snow, fog, or rain can be dangerous and teens must give the task their complete attention.

Customer Service Representative

1215 Thomas G. Wilson Drive

Conway, AR 72032

Tips for Driving in Snow

News

-Clear snow and ice from windows, lights, the hood, and the roof before driving

-Leave plenty of room for stopping.

-Don’t try to out drive the conditions. Remember the posted speed limits are for dry pavement.

-Know the current road conditions.

-Brake early and correctly. It takes more time and distance to stop in adverse conditions.

-Be wary of bridges. They freeze first, making them more dangerous than the approach road.

-Exit ramps sometimes have less anti-icing material than the main line. Be aware of this when exiting the highway.

-Don’t use “cruise control” driving in wintry conditions. Even roads that look clear can have sudden slippery spots. Using your brake on these spots will deactivate cruise control, possibly causing you to lose control of your vehicle.

-Many 4×4 vehicles are heavier than passenger vehicles. This means it takes longer to stop than passenger vehicles. Don’t get overconfident in your 4×4 vehicle. Be wary of your 4×4 vehicle’s traction.

-Look further ahead in traffic than normal.

-Trucks are heavier than cars, making their brake time slower. Avoid cutting quickly in front of them.

-Remember to slow down and always wear your seat belt.

Customer Service Representative

1215 Thomas G. Wilson Drive

Conway, AR 72032

Distracted Driving

News

Each day in the United States, approximately 9 people are killed and more than 1,000 injured in crashes that are reported to involve a distracted driver.

Distracted driving is driving while doing another activity that takes your attention away from driving. Distracted driving can increase the chance of a motor vehicle crash.

What are the types of distraction?

There are three main types of distraction:

Visual: taking your eyes off the road;

Manual: taking your hands off the wheel; and

Cognitive: taking your mind off of driving.

Distracted driving activities

Anything that takes your attention away from driving can be a distraction. Sending a text message, talking on a cell phone, using a navigation system, and eating while driving are a few examples of distracted driving. Any of these distractions can endanger the driver and others.

Texting while driving is especially dangerous because it combines all three types of distraction. Sending or reading a text message takes your eyes off the road for about 5 seconds, long enough to cover a football field while driving at 55 mph.

How big is the problem?

US deaths:  In 2015, 3,477 people were killed in crashes involving a distracted driver.

US injuries: In 2015, 391,000 people were injured in motor vehicle crashes involving a distracted driver.

 

Customer Service Representative

1215 Thomas G. Wilson Drive

Conway, AR 72032

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About

A & J Collision Repair is a full service auto body repair shop. We are located at 1215 Thomas G. Wilson Drive in Conway Arkansas 72032. Come by and visit or give us a call at 501.205.1218.
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